Corporate Social Responsibility in India – Transition from Moral Imperative to Mandatory Expenditure

badge

 

Mandatory spending on Corporate Social Responsibility is the new reality for Corporate India. The enforcement of this provision from April1, 2014, has shifted focus from the debate on whether CSR is a moral imperative or not to how companies can put the mandatory CSR expenditure to effective use.

The provision of the Companies Act 2013, mandates that any company with a net worth of at least Rs 500 crore or a turnover of Rs 1,000 crore or a net profit of at least Rs 5 crore would have to spend at least 2 per cent of its average net profit of the immediately preceding three years. According to the norms, the CSR activities will have to be within India wherein companies can choose from a range of activities such as promoting preventive health care and sanitation, setting up homes and hostels for women and orphans and livelihood enhancement projects. If a company is unable to spend the amount, an explanation will be required in the director’s report.

.

CSR_Lead Essay.indd

As a result of this provision, many corporate enterprises are stepping up their CSR efforts. However, as a matter of fact, many companies still lack the processes to channelize the allocation of these funds. Read more

Companies Bill 2012– Giving Voice to Minority Investors in India

badge

 

The passing of The Companies Bill 2012 by Rajya Sabha on 8th August 2013,  is a step forward towards transformation in the corporate governance practices of the country. The new bill that requires President’s assent for it to become law, replaces the Companies Act of 1956. The bill, when enacted will bring in reforms to enhance corporate governance by giving voice to the minority investors in India, strengthening the role of independent directors and expanding the responsibility on auditors.

A key objective of corporate governance in India has been to strike a balance between the rule of majority shareholders and the protection of the rights of minority shareholders. The protection of minority shareholders rights is particularly critical given the often concentrated ownership of Indian companies.

Unlike in the developed countries such as US & UK, where ownership of a company is widely dispersed and is generally separate from the management of the company. In India, listed companies are usually parts of a large business group, characterized by a promoter or a controlling shareholder.

Read more

%d bloggers like this: