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Book Review

Mixed Bag

‘Making Friends with the Crocodile’ by Mick Canning

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By Somali K Chakrabarti   Prejudices, biases and gender inequalities have always existed in our society, and from time to time these come to the fore front. But, when such points are raised by foreigners, there is always a risk that the writer may succumb to temptation of stereotypical or caricaturish portrayal of the characters or the culture of a country. Making Friends with the Crocodile, written by Mick Canning is a book that highlights gender inequalities prevailing in a North Indian village. Steering clear of stereotypes, the book depicts lives of people in a normal village family, and the conditions that not only dissuade a woman from reporting an assault, but also subjugate her further by holding her responsible for it. Making friends with Crocodiles is available on Amazon.  Here’s a bit about the author. Mick Canning is an Englishman, who has traveled extensively in North India, Nepal and the Middle East. Mick finely captures the essence of these places in words and in pictures in his blog that goes by his name. I have always enjoyed reading his posts on Bodhgaya, Varanasi, Sarnath, and Punjab. While I had been intending to read his book since quite some time, I managed to do so…

Social Issues

Healing the Scars of Child Abuse

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By Somali K Chakrabarti What does a child do when those who are meant to protect her turn into the perpetrators of crime against her? Abuse in the formative years might be the worst kind of agony that a person could be subjected to. When perpetrated by family members it carries with it the burden of guilt and shame, which affects not only the childhood but spills over the entire lifespan of the person. Every time I read about child abuse, it disgusts me to think about the people who indulge in the heinous crime. More disturbing is the thought of children who are made to go through it.   Image credit The Only Way Out Is Through ‘The Only Way Out Is Through,’ written by Shirley J Davis, is a first-hand narrative of the trauma faced by the author who was subjected to abuse in her childhood. While she avoids mention of the explicit details, Shirley mostly uses the form of free flowing poetry to convey the deep scars that were inflicted on her as a child, and the psychological setback she suffered due to the inhuman ordeal.

Mixed Bag

A Dance With The Corporate Ton by Lata Subramanian

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‘What is expected of me?’ This is a question that often comes to the mind of employees while working in an organization. Only sometimes the answer is clear but most of the times employees are left wondering as to what the implicit expectations are, and what it takes to smoothly navigate through the journey in the Corporate World.  

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